Friday, 3 February 2017

Culling of 24 chickens in Sin Ming ruffles feathers


As a debate flared up yesterday over free-ranging chickens that were put down by the authorities in the Sin Ming area, the Agri-Food & Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA) revealed that it received 250 complaints islandwide on free-ranging chickens last year, and they were mostly about noise-related nuisances caused by the birds.

Assistant Professor Frank Rheindt, from the National University of Singapore’s department of biological sciences, believed that the authorities did the right thing from an environmental perspective.

He added: “Every day in Singapore and across the world, hundreds of thousands of chickens are killed for human consumption, so I do not believe there is a valid ‘animal rights’ argument against the culling.”


Some of the comments:

“Every day in Singapore and across the world, hundreds of thousands of chickens are killed for human consumption, so I do not believe there is a valid ‘animal rights’ argument against the culling.”

The difference here, is that while most chickens were killed for consumption, these were killed for "making noise", ie. they were killed for no good reason at all. Its like saying "hundreds of humans die everyday, why should I care if only 1 died?" WTF? Where is your humanity? - Jay Er

Exactly Jay! To Frank Rheind who said brought up the chickens and consumption - Those chickens are bred for consumption These are wild chickens struggling to survive in or concrete jungle. I've spotted a few in Pasir Ris Park and before anyone out there passes a death sentence , try to get a glimple if them. They are lovely! I consider myself lucky to have had a chance to see them in the wild. Please, please don't let AVA etc kill all the wild birds and deny our kids the chance to see them in their natural environment. - Swati Shah, Siglap Secondary School

You mean to say those chickens at Pasir Ris Park are also a bunch of nuisance? Ok, I get it. And we scratch our heads and wonder why our kids grow up to be so 'sua koo' aka not in tune with the flora and fauna of the world... ...scratch until bleed...- Puibao Bao

AGREE totally. Our young people are growing up distanced from nature. They see trees and plants but all in a very artificial setting (we are 1 large landscaped garden) . They are afraid of the tiniest of bugs! Its SO SAD to watch! - Swati Shah, Siglap Secondary School

These are not chickens from the food factories. They are your neighbors that bring you happiness and let you closer to the nature. - Feng Ding

“Every day in Singapore and across the world, hundreds of thousands of chickens are killed for human consumption, so I do not believe there is a valid ‘animal rights’ argument against the culling.”

This is a very warped justification, especially when you mention that animal rights is not valid here. If we apply this same thinking to human rights, you would mean that it is okay if one or two women are raped, as around the world thousands are getting raped too.

Killing should never be the 'best resort' for any living thing in this situation. There will always be many other ways to handle the matter, if you are committed to look hard enough. - Lionel Dorai, Senior Communications Executive at ACRES: Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (Singapore)

Ref: http://www.todayonline.com/singapore/sin-ming-chicken-culling-ruffles-feathers

You may want to read other letters to the press and AVA's reply:
Forum: The right approach to the chicken problem

Forum: Donating unsuitable items a sign of disrespect

I was riled up after reading about the unsuitable items that people donated ("Trashy donations hamper charities' work"; Jan 22).

Food Bank Singapore and the Salvation Army rely on donations in kind from the public to aid them in their work.

They help us to help others by distributing donated goods to those who have need of them.

But it seems that some donors are treating them as rubbish collectors.

What does this say about the mentality of these donors?

First, there is a clear misunderstanding of what it means to be charitable. The word "charity" has its root in the notion of love. We do not treat those we love with disrespect. To give them rubbish is the ultimate insult.

Second, there is a lack of common decency. One of the key virtues in life is to treat others as we would like to be treated. Surely, we would not like it if we were in a dire situation and we were given rubbish.

Donors should reflect on what they give to charities.

Charities have to sort through and dispose of unsuitable donated items. This robs them of precious time that could have been invested in helping their beneficiaries.

It is heartening that some organisations are doing good in Singapore. If we can help them, we should do so. If we cannot, we should not make things more difficult for them.

William Wan (Dr)
General Secretary
Singapore Kindness Movement

Ref: http://www.straitstimes.com/forum/letters-in-print/donating-unsuitable-items-a-sign-of-disrespect