Wednesday, 5 April 2017

Walk around Singapore: VivoCity, Harbourfront & Cruise Centres (April 2017)

Vivocity

Outside



Train ride


Boardwalk


Sentosa train


For adventurous people who like to walk around Singapore - Sentosa, Southern Ridges

Inside


Sky Park & Children's playground


Happy boats

High bar gymnastics

Rooftop water feature for children

  





Open-air playground for kids





View of Sea





Harbourfront Centre





Cruise Centre



Sentosa Cable Tower


Boarding and disembarking gates

Advance care planning

WHAT IS ADVANCE CARE PLANNING (ACP)?

It is a series of conversations that help patients decide on their future healthcare options.

Patients are guided by trained facilitators in these discussions. They also nominate someone who can make decisions on the patient's behalf.

The discussion guides the medical team in making decisions when crisis strikes and the patient is no longer able to communicate. It is free.


WHO CAN DO ACP?

There are three plan types: for healthy adults, those with progressive, life-limiting illnesses, and those expected to die within a year.


HOW IS THIS DIFFERENT FROM ADVANCE MEDICAL DIRECTIVE (AMD) AND THE LASTING POWER OF ATTORNEY (LPA)?

The LPA appoints donees to make decisions - both financial and personal - for patients who lose mental capacity. The AMD is an advance directive stating your preference not to have extraordinary life-sustaining treatment.

Both are legally binding documents and come up during ACP discussions.

The ACP is not a legal document, and only serves as a guide for decision-making when the patient becomes unable to communicate.

Sites to visit:
Advance care planning
Advance medical directive (AMD)
Lasting power of attorney (LPA)

Ref: http://www.tnp.sg/news/singapore/planning-death-still-not-easy-talk-about-taboo-issue

Signs Of A Stroke You Should NEVER Ignore

What is a stroke
A stroke occurs when the blood supply to a part of the brain is cut off (ischemic stroke) or when a blood vessel in the brain ruptures, dumping blood into the spaces surrounding the brain cells (hemorrhagic stroke).

Act FAST

F  = FACE: You may notice a droop or uneven smile.
A = ARMS: Arms may be weak or numb. If you suspect a stroke, ask the person to raise their arms. If the arm drops down or appear unsteady, the person may be having a stroke.
S = SPEECH: Slurred speech may indicate a stroke. Ask the person to repeat something to see how they respond.
T = TIME: This last part of the acronym is a warning to respond quickly if you think someone is having a stroke. Call 911 immediately.

Additional symptoms
Fatigue
Problems with balance and walking
Numb limbs — especially on one side
Problems with vision

Women can have unique symptoms
Weakness
Shortness of breath
Confusion
Unresponsiveness
Fainting
Irritation
Nausea
Vomiting
Hallucinations
Hiccups
Seizures
Pain

How to minimise the risk of stroke
Eat more veggies, nuts and beans
Reduce the amount of red meat you eat and replace it with fresh-caught seafood, free-range poultry and organic eggs.
Reduce your consumption of unhealthy fats, especially those found in highly processed foods.
Maintain a healthy weight.
Treat diabetes if you have the condition.
Reduce your consumption of sugars.
Consume no more than 1500 milligrams (1/2 teaspoon) of sodium daily.
Maintain a healthy blood pressure, ideally 120/80.
Be sure to take your high blood pressure medication as directed.
Get moderate exercise daily, at least 30 minutes.
Don’t smoke or chew tobacco.
Drink alcohol in moderation.
Protein can protect blood vessels.

Ref: http://www.thealternativedaily.com/do-not-ignore-these-stroke-signs/