Thursday, 12 April 2018

Appeal: Four-year-old girl falls from 4th-storey flat, crowdfunding for her medical bill

Image from Yahoo News

Close to $4,000 out of the target of $20,000 has been raised so far from a crowdfunding campaign for a four-year-old girl who fell four storeys from a flat in Tampines last Friday evening (6 April).

The campaign, which was set up by an Aaron Isidro on YouCaring.com to cover the girl’s medical expenses, has been shared 7,000 times on Facebook as of 6.30pm on Wednesday.

According to a description of the campaign, the girl was visiting her mother in Singapore, where she is currently working, when the incident occurred.

“She fell from their unit’s window after opening it herself and fell on the ground with her upper back receiving the most impact,” it said. “As per her doctors, she has fractured her arm and lumbar spine, and has internal haemorrhage in her liver and lungs. She is still scheduled for several medical procedures and tests, one of which is MRI.”

Ref: https://sg.yahoo.com/news/four-year-old-girl-falls-fourth-storey-flat-crowdfunding-medical-bill-103259942.html

New brain memory cells develop well into old age


Well into our 70s, we continue to develop new cells in an area of the brain responsible for new memories and exploration of new environments, scientists report.

"These new brain cells sustain our abilities to make new memories, learn, and cope with the environment, and they are important for emotional responses," Dr. Maura Boldrini from Columbia University in New York City told Reuters Health by email. "These neurons might be important in humans for our abilities to transmit complex information to future generations and to sustain our emotionally guided behavior, as well as for integrating complex memories and information."

Read more @ https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/health/new-brain-memory-cells-develop-well-into-old-age-10121326

People who meditate an hour a day are more resilient to mental decline in old age


Meditating for just one hour a day can buffer the effects of age-related cognitive decline, new research claims.

The researchers at the University of California, Davis, who carried out the study, can't explain why the practice has this effect, but previous studies have found that it can cause brain changes that help people keep their mental abilities.

The current study, spanning seven years, examines the long-term benefits people gained from meditating.

As cognitive impairment impacts an estimated 16 million people in the US, researchers suggest meditation could help with brain aging.

Ref: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-5554887/People-meditate-hour-day-resilient-mental-decline-old-age.html