Monday, 4 June 2018

Exceptional people: Actor Benedict Cumberbatch saves Deliveroo cyclist from muggers


Actor Benedict Cumberbatch has been hailed a "superhero" after saving a Deliveroo cyclist who was being attacked by four muggers, according to reports.

The Sun reported on Friday (Jun 1) that the 41-year-old actor leapt from an Uber car and jumped into the fray when he saw the gang of four muggers beating up a defenceless Deliveroo worker near detective Sherlock Holmes’ fictional home in London’s Baker Street.

Witnesses said he yelled "leave him alone" at the group of muggers, who were punching the cyclist and had smashed him over the head with a bottle. After he dragged the muggers off their bloodied victim, they tried to punch him but he fen­ded them off and they fled, the Sun added.

Read more @ https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/world/hero-sherlock-star-benedict-cumberbatch-saves-deliveroo-cyclist-10331340

Eating a handful of nuts 3 times a week can reduce the risk of developing an irregular heartbeat

Image for illustration only

A large study has found that people who regularly eat a small quantity of nuts could have a lower risk of developing irregular heartbeat, a major cause of stroke.

The research showed that eating nuts at least three times a week was associated with an 18% reduced risk of atrial fibrillation, a heart condition often felt as an irregular heartbeat.

Another finding in the study was that moderate (one- to-two times per week) - but not high consumption - was associated with a lower risk of heart failure.

Ref: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-5771431/Eating-nuts-lower-risk-irregular-heartbeat-major-cause-stroke-new-study-finds.html

Scientists develop method which could help regenerate tooth enamel


Scientists say they have developed a material which could help regenerate tooth enamel - and prevent tooth decay or sensitivity in the future.

Coating the outer part of the teeth, enamel is the hardest tissue in the body and can resist extreme temperatures and acidic food and drinks, helping it last for decades.

But unlike other tissues in the body, once it is lost it cannot regrow - leading to pain and tooth loss for around 50% of the world's population.

Researchers at Queen Mary University of London now say they have developed a new way to grow mineralised material, which could pave the way for regenerating hard tissues such as enamel and bone.

Ref: https://sg.news.yahoo.com/scientists-develop-method-could-help-042319392.html